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Note moyenne 4.08 /5 (sur 12 notes)

Nationalité : Royaume-Uni
Né(e) à : Glasgow, Écosse , le 21/01/1979
Biographie :

Johann Hari est un journaliste, écrivain et essayiste.

Diplômé en sciences sociales et politiques de King's College, Cambridge (2001), il débute sa carrière journalistique à "New Statesman" (2001-2003) avant de rejoindre "The Independent" (Londres).

Il a écrit pour un certain nombre de publications dont The Huffington Post, le New York Times, le Los Angeles Times, le Guardian, le Spectator, Le Monde Diplomatique.

Il est auteur des livres sur le thème de la guerre contre la drogue, la monarchie et la dépression.

En écrivant "La brimade des stups" (Chasing The Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs, 2015), Johann Hari réinterprète par petites touches successives la guerre contre la drogue.

Il a souffert de dépression et expérimenté des antidépresseurs. Spécialiste des addictions, il a recueilli avec "Chaque dépression a un sens" (Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression, 2018) des réactions enthousiastes.

son site : https://2018.johannhari.com/
page Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/JohannHari.Page/
Twitter : https://twitter.com/johannhari101
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Le professeur Dautzenberg, préfacier de "La Brimade des stups" et Johann Hari, son auteur. Vidéo réalisée par Florian di Maria


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torezu   27 janvier 2020
Chaque dépression a un sens de Johann Hari
Baboons are locked in their hierarchy. They need somebody at the bottom to beat up and humiliate. [...] But humans do have a choice. We can find practical ways to dismantle hierarchies and create a more equal place, where everybody feels they have a measure of respect and status. Or we can build up hierarchies and ramp up the humiliation—as we are doing today. When we do that, many of us will feel we are being pushed down, almost physically, and many of us will show signs of submission. We’ll lower our heads and our bodies and silently say: Leave me alone. You beat me. I can’t take this any more.
Commenter  J’apprécie          20
torezu   19 février 2020
Chaque dépression a un sens de Johann Hari
You will try to get rid of the depressed feelings in your head. But that won’t work unless you get rid of the causes of the depressed feelings in your life. No, I would say to my younger self—your distress is not a malfunction. It is a signal—a necessary signal. [...] you are at a fork in the road now. You can try to muffle the signal. That will lead you to many wasted years when the pain will persist. Or you can listen to the signal and let it guide you—away from the things that are hurting and draining you, and toward the things that will meet your true needs.
Commenter  J’apprécie          20
Flodopas78   15 février 2021
Chaque dépression a un sens de Johann Hari
Depuis des décennies les scientifiques connaissent la véritable histoire de la dépression et de l'anxiété. Les causes de ces maladies sont de trois types : biologiques, psychologiques et sociales. Toutes ont un effet réel et aucune ne se résume à un simple déséquilibre chimique. Les causes sociales et psychologiques ont été passées sous silence pendant une longue période, alors que, sans elles, les causes biologiques n'auraient sans doute aucune influence..
Commenter  J’apprécie          20
torezu   30 janvier 2020
Chaque dépression a un sens de Johann Hari
Your brain is constantly changing to meet your needs. It does this mainly in two ways: by pruning the synapses you don’t use, and by growing the synapses you do use. So, for example, if you raise a baby in total darkness, 5 the baby will shed the synapses that relate to eyesight—the brain has figured out he won’t need them and that it’s better to deploy that brainpower somewhere else. For as long as you live, this neuroplasticity never stops, and the brain “is always changing,”[...] Because you are feeling intense pain for a long period, your brain will assume this is the state in which you are going to have to survive from now on—so it might start to shed the synapses that relate to the things that give you joy and pleasure, and strengthen the synapses that relate to fear and despair. That’s one reason why you can often start to feel you have become somehow fixed in a state of depression or anxiety even if the original causes of the pain seem to have passed.
Commenter  J’apprécie          10
torezu   20 janvier 2020
Chaque dépression a un sens de Johann Hari
When you’re a child, you have very little power to change your environment. You can’t move away, or force somebody to stop hurting you. So you have two choices. You can admit to yourself that you are powerless—that at any moment, you could be badly hurt, and there’s simply nothing you can do about it. Or you can tell yourself it’s your fault. If you do that, you actually gain some power—at least in your own mind. If it’s your fault, then there’s something you can do that might make it different. You aren’t a pinball being smacked around a pinball machine. You’re the person controlling the machine. [...] In this way, just like obesity protected those women from the men they feared would rape them, blaming yourself for your childhood traumas protects you from seeing how vulnerable you were and are. You can become the powerful one. If it’s your fault, it’s under your control.
Commenter  J’apprécie          10
torezu   19 janvier 2020
Chaque dépression a un sens de Johann Hari
we haven’t just started doing things alone more, in every decade since the 1930s. We have started to believe that doing things alone22 is the natural state of human beings, and the only way to advance. We have begun to think: I will look after myself, and everybody else should look after themselves, as individuals. Nobody can help you but you. Nobody can help me but me. These ideas now run so deep in our culture that we even offer them as feel-good bromides to people who feel down—as if it will lift them up. But John has proven that this is a denial of human history, and a denial of human nature. It leads us to misunderstand our most basic instincts. And this approach to life makes us feel terrible.
Commenter  J’apprécie          10
torezu   19 janvier 2020
Chaque dépression a un sens de Johann Hari
When he put lonely people into brain-scanning machines, he noticed something. They would spot potential threats within 150 milliseconds, while it took socially connected people twice as long, 300 milliseconds, to notice the same threat. What was happening? Protracted loneliness causes you to shut down socially, and to be more suspicious of any social contact, he found. You become hypervigilant. You start to be more likely to take offense where none was intended, and to be afraid of strangers. You start to be afraid of the very thing you need most. John calls this a “snowball” effect, as disconnection spirals into more disconnection.
Commenter  J’apprécie          10
torezu   19 janvier 2020
Chaque dépression a un sens de Johann Hari
Lonely people are scanning for threats because they unconsciously know that nobody is looking out for them, so no one will help them if they are hurt. This snowball effect, he learned, can be reversed—but to help a depressed or severely anxious person out of it, they need more love, and more reassurance, than they would have needed in the first place. The tragedy, John realized, is that many depressed and anxious people receive less love, as they become harder to be around. Indeed, they receive judgment, and criticism, and this accelerates their retreat from the world. They snowball into an ever colder place.
Commenter  J’apprécie          10
torezu   08 février 2020
Chaque dépression a un sens de Johann Hari
how weird it is—the idea that we should all sit apart from one another, pursuing our own little story, watching our own little TV, and ignoring everyone around us. “It’s normal,” he said, “that you care.”
Commenter  J’apprécie          20
lauranns   30 décembre 2019
Chaque dépression a un sens de Johann Hari
"Les sociétés pharmaceutiques jouent un rôle majeur dans la définition de ce qu'est la psychiatrie aujourd'hui, car ce sont des acteurs économiques extrêmement puissants, qui représentent des milliards de dollars" dit-il. comme se sont elles qui paient la facture, elles définissent les priorités. Or elles ont tout intérêt à présenter notre souffrance comme un problème chimique susceptible d'être résolu chimiquement. En conséquence, nous avons, dans nos sociétés, une représentation faussée de notre propre détresse.
Commenter  J’apprécie          10

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Harry Potter et le Prisonnier d'Askaban

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